Rochester, NY – Our Back-Yard part 13. ~ By Tom and Audrey ~

Welcome back fellow bloggers and followers.  It’s always nice seeing you visit and comment on our journeys and this series of Rochester, NY part 13.

Eastman Theater, Rochester, NY. http://www.usathroughoureyes.com

This outing we enjoyed “Spot Coffee” a local bistro offering a great place to relax with ones special coffee and sweet treat while savoring the sights and sounds of city life enveloping it.  Spot Coffee is located on East Avenue that runs from Rochester’s center, southeast out of the city, and through Brighton before it ends up at Nazareth College. Its urban portion forms the core of three neighborhoods: the lively East End, the East Avenue Historic District of beautiful Victorian homes, and the largely commercial Culver/University/East.

From here we strolled a couple streets over to the renowned Eastman School of Music.  For those of you having never visited please do. Their schedule of musical events range from student recitals to concerts by those tops in their field.  It was while we were admiring the architecture in the main foyer that we met students Amelia, Daniel and James.  Each were in their senior year and shared the emotions of it being their last year and preparing for that final recital.  Amelia summed up the feelings so well, “it is when you are about to go on stage and you realize, this is it, after this then what.”  The emotion she said it with exuded passion for her love of music.  Daniel noted his final performance at the school is set for 9 p.m., April 15th, 2017 at Eastman’s Hatch Recital Hall. We intend to be there to see his performance.  These young students have talents that truly amaze us.  We know someday when they hit their stride we’ll be hearing more of them and be able to say we once knew them when…..  From here it was back home to relax.  We hope to see you again as we make our rounds through beautiful Rochester and its surrounding communities and in the mean time enjoy the pictures and videos of these magnificent places.  Did you remember to click on one of the photographs to see it full screen and see the rest of them as a screen slideshow?

Our visit to Spot Coffee and Eastman Theater, Rochester, NY.

If you missed one of the previous parts just hover your cursor over one of these series on “Rochester, NY – Our Back-Yard part 1”, “Rochester, NY – Our Back-Yard part 2”, “Rochester, NY – Our Back-Yard part 3”, “Rochester, NY – Our Back-Yard part 4”, “Rochester, NY – Our Back-Yard part 5”, “Rochester, NY – Our Back Yard part 6”, “Rochester, NY – Our Back Yard part 7”, “Rochester, NY – Our Back Yard part 8”, “Rochester, NY – Our Back Yard part 9”, “Rochester, NY – Our Back Yard part 10”, “Rochester, NY – Our Back Yard part 11” or “Rochester, NY – Our Back Yard part 12”.  and you’ll be up to speed.

Please remember if you get lost just click on the “USA Through Our Eyes” heading and you will be brought back to the home page.

Now don’t forget to check out more photos by “Audrey on “Instagram”.

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  1. Debbie L

    My daughter’s childhood best friend lives in Rochester. She and I flew from Virginia to there to attend her wedding, my daughter was a bridesmaid. We were there for 5 days and lived it!!! But the winters scared us, otherwise it’s a place we’d consider living in! We were there in August.
    Love seeing these young musicians! How inspiring they are!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • usathroughoureyes

      What a small world it is Deb. Isn’t it something how links occur as time passes. Yes, winters are for sure a challenge. They ebb and flow from year to year. Its funny to hear this was at one time on your places to live list. We are now looking at Virginia as on our list to live. Yes, young musicians are so precious in their ability to look a music and bring freshness to it.

      Like

      Reply
  2. Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC

    The windows are amazing – thanks so much for including photos of them. I am so grateful when architects and their benefactors go to the extra expense of including anything beyond the practically ubiquitous endless repetition of portal sameness.

    No matter how interesting the buildings otherwise, I am *always* drawn away from them to the ones with interesting windows. To my eyes, even the “all glass” buildings pale in comparison.
    xx,
    mgh
    (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
    ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
    “It takes a village to educate a world!”

    Like

    Reply
    • usathroughoureyes

      Isn’t it so true about windows. To us the architects choice of windows, doors and colors top off the design of a home. It is great how the older style homes used the placement of windows to augment the homes personality.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      • usathroughoureyes

        One always laughs when out and about with us because our heads are always pivoting to see the details of our surroundings. When permitted I am always touching to feel the texture of things and marveling at their creation or the creator. When in my furniture building period of life I use to love rubbing the different woods to feel their beauty and smell the fragrant aromas each had. Isn’t it fun exploring and using all the senses to immerse into the moments of time we encounter.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC

        I was the same in NYC – all 20 years I lived there. Friends used to say I was was worse than the tourists. 🙂 I never understood how they could be surrounded by sights like that and NOT look up?

        You built furniture?! When, and why did you quit? My Dad was quite handy in that way before his life became too complex for hobbies of any sort (after they could finally afford to buy nice furniture – lol) I used to love to watch him work and hand him tools.

        One of my early dreams was my own wood shop. When I realized the time I would have to dedicate, I abandoned it, but I love my power tools and would be happy as a clam to have a garage in which to set up a “fix & build” workshop. Finding a way to store and use power tools in an apt. is quite the challenge!
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      • usathroughoureyes

        Monthly visits to NYC were filled with joy, embracing every sight, sound and taste one could experience. Yes, grew up in a carpenters household so learned the skills young. The skills allowed college to be paid off and toys to be obtained above the meager earnings of a social worker. It gave balance. As you know you rarely see completion working with individuals but when you build a cabinet or a house there is closure.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC

        You paid off your college education with carpentry? You must have been a busy do-bee during those years!

        I never thought about the lack of closure aspect in the helping professions – and you are so right. We seldom get to see what happens in the lives of clients once they move on. Sometimes I hear from somebody who lets me know how they are doing, but for the most part I can only wonder – even with the impact of anything I write.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      • usathroughoureyes

        Many a character building moment with little sleep. Then there was the volunteer work using the classroom time to build the resume in hopes of a job down the road after graduation. Yes, we rarely get the opportunity to see the growth in many. I must say though I was very blessed in my career to get letters many years after working with offenders thanking me for challenging them to grow. Received a few bruises helping them listen but all worth it, lol.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC

        Funny how we think we can do without sleep when we’re young! It seems that only at the farther end of life do we ever get enough sleep, once we can stop “building the resume” (which began in HS to “get into a good college”).

        Two of my biggest goals when I began training coaches was to get the [large numbers of] ADDers out of the prison system – and keep them from going in.

        To my knowledge, I have only one student (now colleague) working with ADDers in the prison system – in Delaware, if memory serves. I am SO proud of her.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      • usathroughoureyes

        Isn’t it true… Back then sleep was something you ran away from not realizing the body needed it, lol. All for the rush to climb the ladder of “success”. Yes, the prison world has many with challenges (many inflicted by lifestyle) that when one is aware can help them to accommodate and move them forward. Those were the great successes seen. We had some great teams of professionals to accomplish this and perhaps this is why we had such high success rates with achieving GED’s.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC

        Tough job – and you are amazing to have chosen that career – but I’ll bet the rewards of making a difference were palpable. High GED success rates alone can turn many lives around. Congratulations.

        If ALL prisons were run with a mind toward rehabilitation rather than punishment, I’m sure our prison stats wouldn’t be so disgracefully high – America first in that regard is truly shameful. (it represents +/- 4.4 percent of the world’s population yet houses +/- 22 percent of the world’s prisoners).

        But even that “industry” has come under the control of corporate capitalists, so I doubt that recidivism concerns them much at all. Sadly, it seems they plan for it.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      • usathroughoureyes

        For many states including NY the prison industry is big business. It is sad to see and in bad need of many reforms. Unfortunately many folks don’t want to hear about the needs of prisons. They just want the bad guy put away without thinking eventually they will return to a neighborhood near us.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Madelyn Griffith-Haynie, MCC, SCAC

        They WILL and they DO, actually. Few are warehoused for life.

        My concern is more for the lives of those who enter the prison system. The concept of throw-away people has always been disturbing, and one I doubt I’ll ever understand (those that don’t think about it represent a significant segment of the empathy-averse population, I fear).
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

      • usathroughoureyes

        Each person I worked with had so much to offer the world but their hurt and anger took them in bad directions. I have always said there was a fine line between me wearing the shirt and tie and the ones wearing green.

        Liked by 1 person

    • usathroughoureyes

      Hi Theresa. Spot Coffee is a fun place to grab a wrap and special coffee and people watch. The last scene was as we drove through downtown Rochester and the Police use horses to patrol the area. It is neat as they go up and down the city streets and seeing all the kids and adults coming out to talk the Officers and pet the horses. The community really supports there presence. We always stop too because we are like kids, lol.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      • TheresaBarker

        “We always stop too because we are like kids,” – love this! Yum, a wrap and coffee sounds lovely. And rubbing elbows with students in the arts! What could be better.

        Like

      • usathroughoureyes

        So true Theresa about rubbing elbows with the students over coffee and a wrap. We so enjoy this because it keeps us young and hearing the dreams of these young minds. I drool over their musical abilities and maturity.

        Liked by 1 person

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