The Journey to Florida and Now Back Toward Home, Day 20. ~ By Tom ~

troy-al-to-desoto-state-park-fort-payne-al-day-20-capture

Day 20 – Troy, AL to Desoto State Park, Fort Payne, AL

Hello everyone.  January 5th, Thursday and day 20 of our journey back home.  We woke this morning at Deer run RV Park in Troy, AL around 10 a.m. and could feel a definite drop in temperature.  After breakfast and a shower we left heading north through the gateway of the Talladega National Forest on roadways that showcased some of the richest, poorest, windy, twisty, scenic and not so scenic areas and townships one could imagine.  It was then we came around a sharp corner and noticed on our right an old run down cemetery.  There was such an aura about this place that just beckoned us to stop so we did.  We then discovered it was known as “The Old Shiloh Cemetery” and listed on the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage in Nixburg, AL.  As we walked and read the epitaphs on the standing, fallen and broken headstones circa early 1800’s, history was being revealed to us of the Nixburg founding families.  The place was not totally forgotten however as evidenced by some of the grave sites adorned with newly placed flags and plastic flowers.  Cemeteries can reveal so much about a community and are often like small villages known by the nickname “Cities of the Dead.”

From here it was back on the road heading north through Kellyton, Dadeville, Mellow Valley and Lineville.  In Lineville, we stopped at a park, made lunch and rested awhile walking around a nicely created memorial park that paid tribute to our Americas Veterans.  On a side note Lineville was settled first by Native Americans however the Creek Indian War of 1813 resulted in their removal.

From here it was on to Desoto State Park where we would spend the night.  As we drove in we were greeted by a heard of white tail deer grazing.  This park is located in Fort Payne, AL and is gorgeous.  Once again, we were amazed at how well maintained the southern state campgrounds are and how abandoned they were this time of year.  Because we had called ahead we were able to drive right in and to our site.  On a historical note this place was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and is nestled atop beautiful Lookout Mountain.  If you are ever in this section of Alabama and want a great place to camp this is it.  The temperature was a chilly 35 degrees so after walking Emma for a while it was time to settle in to a great dinner and conversation as the gentle snow came down around us.

On this date we traveled 232 miles between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.  Again, we didn’t break any records because there was so much to see.

usathroughoureyes
22
  1. prior..

    well that cemetery photo with the flag is outstanding – all the photos are nice – but that one – on the low like that and the soft focus – should be framed.

    and this part:

    “richest, poorest, windy, twisty, scenic and not so scenic areas and townships one could imagine….”

    reminded me of places in south carolina –

    also – good thing to call ahead, hiuh?

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    • usathroughoureyes

      Thank you for your encouragement. Sometimes I think of giving up photography for golf but then again that’s why I tried photography, lol. We love exploring and going down those roads because they remind us of life. Calling ahead is vital 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. adventuresoffiveblog

    Lovely photos and insight; I especially enjoyed your musings on Old Shiloh Cemetery. I’ve often pondered these seemingly abandoned cemeteries and am fascinated by the juxtaposed signs of modern life and remembrance. Thank you for giving these untold stories a voice!

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  3. weekendcampervanning

    I haven’t traveled to this part of the states, thanks for giving me a glimpse. Interesting to hear about the history as well. The pictures are beautiful! I can get a sense or feeling of the place after looking at them.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
    • usathroughoureyes

      Thank you for helping us by this feedback. We are learning from individuals like yourself that are there on scene showing us what they see through their pictures and words. Its like our own personal history lesson.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  4. TheresaBarker

    Deer Run Park is just beautiful, as you say. I love how your photos and text compliment each other. Nice way of honoring the aboriginal inhabitants with your sentence about their removal. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  5. Miss Gentileschi

    Ohh! Another coincidence! I just spent a day at one of Berlin´s oldest cemeteries too and made a lot of pictures that I´m going to share soon. 🙂 Love the pics, especially the one with the mist rising from the pond – just beautiful! Have a wonderful weekend!

    Liked by 2 people

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